Mitchell | Hamline School of Law
Course Information Pages

Experiential


Business Communication Skills (2019)

Business Communications Skills is a Law and Business skills course that prepares law students to make effective presentations to business people seeking a lawyers' advice on business matters. Students who complete the course successfully will know how to prepare and deliver concise and well-structured presentations that inform and persuade. Through intensive in-class practice, students will learn (i) the context and craft of preparation for making presentations as well as (ii) the three basic elements of all effective oral presentations.

Grading: Letter graded

Credits: 1

Offered: Summer

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Business and Commercial

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Tax Research (2608)

In this class, students will learn the major research resources in tax law and the skills to conduct research using those resources. Tax law research has a lot in common with general legal research, e.g., the search for controlling statutes and precedential cases. But tax law research is unique in that Treasury Department and IRS publications are essential. Therefore, to conduct tax law research, the knowledge of the hierarchy of administrative law materials and their locations is critical, in addition to the general knowledge of codes, cases and legislative history.

Grading: Letter graded

Credits: 1

Offered: e/o Fall

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Taxation

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Marshall Brennan Seminar (3009)

Law students selected to be Marshall-Brennan Fellows are placed in St. Paul public high schools in pairs to teach constitutional law to 11th and 12th graders. Following a base curriculum, Fellows plan lessons, conduct classes, and grade assignments. Fellows teach in the high schools five days a week for approximately nine weeks. Coinciding with their high school placement, Fellows participate in a weekly seminar taught by law school faculty. The weekly seminar focuses on constitutional cases of particular interest and relevance to high school students. During the seminar, Fellows learn about the constitutional law cases they will be teaching and develop teaching strategies and lesson plans. The semester concludes with a moot court competition in which all the high school students are encouraged to participate. ebsite.

Grading: Letter graded

Credits: 4

Offered: Fall

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Constitutional Law and Civil Rights

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Mergers and Acquisitions (3013)

This course will examine the legal and practical issues that arise in connection with mergers and acquisitions of U.S. businesses. More specifically, the course will be divided into two sections. The first part of the course will examine the techniques used to accomplish merger & acquisition transactions and the legal rules relevant to these transactions. The second part of the course will shift to a transactional perspective and students will engage in a simulated merger or acquisition transaction.

Grading: Letter graded

Credits: 4

Offered: Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Business and Commercial

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Deals and Dispute Resolution (3014)

This is a one-week intensive simulation course in which students will simulate making deals and resolving disputes as lawyers, with emphasis on reviewing documents, identifying legal issues, counseling clients orally and in writing, negotiating, drafting, and working collaboratively. The course focuses on the student's role as a professional and enables the student to identify strengths and weaknesses for further professional development. Students will research and write on a range of related doctrinal issues, including business law, privacy law, international law, intellectual property, and constitutional law.

Grading: Letter graded. .

Credits: 3

Offered: Summer

Categories: Experiential

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Expert Witness Advocacy (3015)

This one-week immersion course provides students a unique opportunity to interact with professional scientists and expert witnesses as they develop and improve their advocacy skills. The course is run in conjunction with the Expert Witness Training Academy (EWTA), which provides hands-on training to researchers, professors, graduate students, and other climate scientists from leading universities and advocacy organizations from across the country. Students work directly with EWTA participants in simulated depositions, oral arguments, direct and cross-examinations of expert witnesses, arbitrations, legislative hearings, Daubert hearings, and jury trials.

Grading: Pass/Fail

Credits: 3

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

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Minnesota Legal Research (3017)

This skills course will focus on the sources of Minnesota law and the resources used to research them. Students will review the research concepts and strategies learned in WRAP and learn advanced research skills in the context of Minnesota law. This course will look at primary and secondary resources on the state and municipal level. Students will complete weekly exercises in a variety of formats which will assess student proficiency in using the research resources, and students' ongoing development of research skills. A final research project may also be required.

Grading: Pass/Fail

Credits: 1

Offered: Irregularly

Categories: Experiential

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Health Care Compliance Skills (3022)

This course is designed to expose students to key legal and operational concepts in the health care compliance field. Students use knowledge gained in prior mandatory coursework and participate in simulation-based projects that require them to perform audits, investigations, and reporting activities to ensure compliance with applicable federal and state laws. The course also includes a mentoring component that builds on the theory of experiential learning whereby students are paired with industry professionals effectively linking Hamline’s strong academic/classroom environment with the real world of health care compliance. Prerequisites: Health Care Compliance Institute

Grading: Letter graded

Credits: 3

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Health Law

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Advanced Advocacy: Criminal Trial (3034)

Provides training in trial advocacy skills for each stage of trial. Areas covered include: ethics, psychology of persuasion, opening statement, direct examination, exhibits, objections, cross-examination, and closing argument. The teaching methods will include lecture, demonstration, discussion, simulation, instructor critique, and video critique. The final exam will be a trial.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: 3

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

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Externship: Health Law (3036)

This course focuses on Externships in health law and health care compliance. In addition to the Field Placement work, students are required to attend a two-hour seminar to discuss their externship experiences as well as legal, ethical, and professional issues raised by the professor. In between class sessions, students must complete written exercises assigned by the professor.

Grading: Pass/Fail

Credits: Variable

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

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Mediation (3040)

Through discussion, simulations, and role-play, this course focuses on the structure and goals of the mediation process and the skills and techniques mediators use to aid parties in overcoming barriers to dispute resolution. The course also examines the underlying negotiation orientations and strategies that mediators may confront and employ, the roles of attorneys and clients, dealing with difficult people and power imbalances, cultural considerations, and ethical issues for lawyers and mediators. In addition, special attention is devoted to the art of successful representation of clients in mediation. Students cannot earn credit in both 8241 Family Mediation and 3040 Mediation.

Grading: Letter graded

Credits: 3

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

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Clinic: Employment Discrimination Mediation (3042)

Students will represent employees claiming employment discrimination who have been referred to mediation proceedings. In a unique collaboration with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the Minnesota Department of Human Rights, students help solve real clients' problems through alternatives to litigation. The clinic also provides an introduction to employment law practice and procedures.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: Variable

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Employment Law

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Clinic: Innocence (3043)

Students work side-by-side with staff attorneys in the Innocence Project of Minnesota as they investigate and litigate inmates' claims of actual innocence. These investigations go to the heart of current issues in the criminal justice system, such as the reliability of eyewitness identification, the problem of false confessions, the use of snitches and informants, government misconduct, ineffective assistance of counsel, and forensic sciences including DNA testing. Class time is divided among class work, discussion of cases, and periodic guest speakers selected both for the general subject matter and for the specific cases under review. This clinic puts students on the cutting edge of scientific and social science issues that affect the practice of law in the criminal justice system as well as hands-on experience in managing and analyzing large-scale cases for litigation. This clinic is a full-year clinic that carries 3 credits per semester in the fall and spring.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: 3

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Criminal Law

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Clinic: State Public Defenders Postconviction (3044)

The State Public Defender Postconviction Clinic offers students the opportunity to provide criminal legal representation to low income persons. Each student represents approximately four to six clients in a wide variety of criminal law cases, handling them from start to finish under the supervision of an experienced attorney at the Minnesota State Public Defender’s Office. Students participate in all phases of practice, from client interviewing through any scheduled court hearings, and are exposed to a law firm setting where they do their work. Typical cases include post-conviction motions on issues such as sentencing, restitution, conditional release, guilty plea withdrawal, parole and probation revocation, and end of confinement community notification. There may be the opportunity for appellate advocacy, as well as challenges to underlying convictions for persons facing deportation. Along with hands-on experience, classroom instruction on various aspects of practice is provided in the student's first semester. This course requires travel to one or more of the institutions and work at the Minnesota State Public Defender’s Office.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: Variable

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

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Externship: Alternative Dispute Resolution (3045)

The Alternative Dispute Resolution externship gives students the opportunity to observe and participate in the work of lawyers who act as problem solvers and advisors, and in the roles of neutral conflict resolvers for private, government or other public interest clients. Depending on student interest and the needs of a placement site, externships include traditional ADR and other negotiation and problem solving assignments. Placements are available in private firms and with government entities. Students will gain insights into assessing conflicts for appropriate conflict resolution, maintaining impartiality, the difference between advising clients and acting as a neutral, methods of dispute resolution, and problem solving approaches used by neutrals. Students will develop practical skills and experience. In addition, students will meet in a seminar-type class for up to six sessions a semester to develop legal skills, share knowledge, and reflect on their work.

Grading: Pass/Fail

Credits: Variable

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Dispute Resolution

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Challenging Conversations (3047)

Based on the book, Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most, authored by Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, and Sheila Heen, this course challenges students to master key communication and conflict processing skills. Negotiating when we are personally and emotionally involved is one of our greatest challenges. But is it possible not to be involved? Can we check our feelings at the door? Communication skills, like handling challenging conversations, allow negotiation to happen, and help us get back on track when things get stuck. The course focuses on two skills dimensions: internal skills – the ability to work with your thoughts and feelings before and during a conversation; and external skills – the things we need to say and do in a conversation to help it go better. Mastering these skills offers the possibility of negotiation success even when your negotiating partners do not share your aspiration to collaborate. The course is constructed as an intensive workshop, including group discussion, simulations, and challenging conversations set in a wide variety of contexts.

Grading:

Credits: 1

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

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Clinic: Mediation (3048)

The Mediation Clinic provides students with an opportunity to use and develop their facilitative mediation skills by serving as mediators in Ramsey County Conciliation and Housing Courts and community mediations through the Dispute Resolution Center (DRC). Students will also have the opportunity to assist the DRC in case development. Students will begin by observing Conciliation and Housing Court and mediation sessions and advance to participating as co-mediators, and ultimately as independent mediators, all under supervision. The clinic will be composed of approximately 40-45 hours of in-court (or community) casework; 30 hours of reflective and out-of-class work; and 18 hours of in-class time.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: Variable

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

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Clinic: Health Law (3062)

This clinic offers students the opportunity to represent individuals whose health is being affected by a legal concern. Because there are many social determinants of health, the clinic handles a wide range of case types. Students will gain experience in interviewing, counseling, and litigating client matters and interacting with health providers at a community health center.

Grading:

Credits:

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

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Bank Audit and Compliance (3261)

This course is designed to expose students to key legal, regulatory, and risk management concepts in conducting bank compliance audits and examinations. This course also examines state and federal bank regulatory agencies, and the power and enforcement authority of regulatory agencies. Students will participate in exercises that will require them to apply concepts involving examinations and supervisory actions, audits, and compliance risk management programs. Prerequisite: Banking Law

Grading: Letter

Credits: 2

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

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Work of the Solo & Small Firm Lawyer & the Quality of Justice - Seminar (3280)

70% of all lawyers in the U.S. work solo or in firms of 10 or fewer lawyers. These firms are where retail justice is made--or mangled--every day, and where the country's access to justice challenge will be met or not. This course explores this independent and entrepreneurial sector of the profession through placements in solo and small firms. Students also meet weekly to share their experiences in the legal workplace and to study the economic, ethical, social, and technological imperatives and tensions of practice in these settings. The objective of the field experience is to work alongside and observe a solo or small firm lawyer as she engages in a variety of practice activities and to analyze those activities. Every student must secure a field placement site before the first class meeting.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: 2

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

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Externship: Work Of The Lawyer Seminar (3290)

Work of the Lawyer students engage in a rigorous study of the often-conflicting moral, professional, financial, personal, and political imperatives inherent in the work of the lawyer. The course consists of two components: a seminar component worth two credits and a field experience worth either one or two credits. The seminar component involves reading, discussion and writing about the theoretical social and political underpinnings of the lawyer's role and work in the legal system, and about the personal and professional values, goals, and concerns of the students. Students will be required to lead seminar discussions. The course requires several written submissions in which students reflect on their field experiences, the readings, and their own values. The objective of the field experience is to observe or work alongside a lawyer as he or she engages in a variety of lawyering activities. The focus will be to observe the informal, behind-the-scenes activities of lawyers. Students are responsible for finding their own field placements.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: 2

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential

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Comparative Law - Lawyers: Opponents of Democracy? - Field Placement (3502)

A limited number of students enrolled in Comparative Law: Lawyers-Opponents of Democracy? (3500) may enroll in this course. Students will be placed with organizations working on democracy-related projects, which could include democracy oversight and reform work, democracy-related legal research or legal work that relates to democracy-building skills (such as negotiation or community organizing). The instructor will assign students to placements after individual consultation with the students, but students are welcome to propose ideas for field placements. Students will write papers that may, but need not, qualify as papers meeting the advanced research and writing requirement. This paper may be a research or policy piece written as part of the student's placement work or, if none is required, may be written as an add-on to the placement work. In either case, the paper must tackle a real-world problem in maintaining and promoting democracy in a particular setting, and the paper will be reviewed and graded by the instructor working in consultation with the field supervisor. Students will also be required to use journaling to engage in critical reflection on whether and how their fieldwork actually promotes democracy and whether, in so doing, it promotes justice in some way. Students who successfully complete this course and related seminar course will receive a Keystone designation on their transcripts.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: variable

Offered: Irregularly

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: International and Comparative Law

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IP - Appellate Practice (3600)

This course is a skills-development class directed at teaching the specialized legal writing and oral advocacy skills needed to bring appeals of intellectual property disputes before the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. Through a combination of weekly written assignments, preparation of a written appellate brief, and delivery of an oral argument, students will learn the advocacy skills needed to successfully appeal a patent, trademark or copyright dispute to the CAFC, which has exclusive jurisdiction over such appeals.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: 3

Offered: Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Intellectual Property

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Externship: Family Law (4040)

Students intern with family law practitioners engaged in various professional roles such as mediator, collaborative lawyer, guardian ad litem and traditional practitioner in private and public settings. During the semester, externs will meet regularly as a group with the faculty supervisor. These two hour meetings will encourage critical analysis and reflection. Students may be placed in existing externships or may locate and propose their own placement.

Grading: Pass/Fail

Credits: variable

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Child and Family Law

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Public International Law Research Workshop I (4349)

This course is designed to meet two goals: ( a ) provide an intensive overview of the structure of the basic sources and principles of Public International Law, and ( b ) provide a broad introduction to the research methods and tools used in Public International Law. Students complete weekly exercises designed to facilitate the attainment of both goals. This course is a prerequisite for, and precursor to, "Public International Law Research Workshop II", offered in the Fall semester.

Grading: Regular written work.

Credits: 1

Offered: Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: International and Comparative Law

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Independent Externship (4355)

Independent Externship is a for-credit course, in which the student takes responsibility for much of his or her own learning by working in a field placement site under the guidance of a field supervisor (must have a J.D.) and faculty supervisor. Placement sites can be for profit or nonprofit entities, such as law firms, corporations, county and state offices and nonprofit agencies. To gain credit, students need to follow the program criteria, including completing an Education Agreement. The Agreement must contain the student's learning goals and a description of field activities. For more information and for the Education Agreement Form, click here.

Grading: Pass/Fail.

Credits: variable

Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer

Categories: Experiential

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Externship: Government Agency (4356)

The course is designed to provide students the opportunity to observe, participate in, analyze, gain insight into the functions of and reflect upon the work of a government agency lawyer. In their field placements, students will observe and participate in activities specific to the field placement, which can include transactions, appeals, rulemaking, legislation, policy and employment and labor issues. In addition to doing fieldwork, students attend a seminar on a regular basis during the semester. Students will bring their experience into the classroom for detailed analysis of the lawyers' work, function of the different agencies, the government decision making process, and the role of the government lawyer. Students interested in the class will be directed to apply for the federal, state agency and local government agency externships that have been established by the Externship Director. Students may also find their own placements and may register for the course after receiving permission from the instructor. To apply, students need to contact the faculty.

Grading: Pass/Fail.

Credits: 3

Offered: e/o Fall

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Government Practice

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Externship: Veterans Law (4357)

The course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to observe, participate in, represent, and reflect upon the work of attorneys whose practice includes representation of veterans. Students will be introduced to an interdisciplinary approach to representing veteran clients who need assistance on legal matters such as family, criminal, and housing law. Students will perform pro bono representation of veterans under the supervision of experienced attorneys. In addition to doing field work, students will attend seven class sessions and meet individually with the professors a few times during the semester. Class sessions will cover topics relating to legal issues specific to veterans. This is open to all students, both non-veterans and veterans.

Grading: Pass/Fail.

Credits: 2

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential

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Public International Law Research Workshop II (4359)

This course is designed to fulfill two objectives: (a) provide thorough preparation and appropriate experience for participation in the Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition, and (b) provide an opportunity for students to do detailed research, prepare an extensive brief, and practice oral-argument skills, in the area of Public International Law. Students spend most of the semester preparing a memorial regarding the Jessup Moot Court problem for that year, and then toward the end of the semester they practice oral argumentation based on their memorials. The official law school team for the following year's Jessup Competition will be chosen from among the students in this workshop at the end of the semester.

Grading: Letter-graded.

Credits: 1

Offered: Fall

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: International and Comparative Law

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Negotiation (4575)

This course will focus on developing skills through simulated negotiations, case studies, exercises and class discussion, with readings that emphasize practical application. The goals of the negotiation course include the following: 1) providing students with hands-on experience and practice in negotiating deals and resolving disputes; 2) sharing with students proven models and frameworks for effective negotiations; 3) exposing students to a variety of negotiation contexts and approaches; 4) acquainting students with the ethical and legal issues surrounding negotiation practice and implementation; and 5) giving students a broader perspective on a lawyer's role beyond the adversarial method to resolving conflict.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: 3

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Dispute Resolution

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Child Abuse and the Law (4590)

This course is for students who have an interest in public service and children's issues. The course is designed to provide an overview of the prosecution process in civil and criminal cases involving child abuse and neglect. Students will learn the internal path of both a criminal child abuse case, as well as the civil process for protecting children from further abuse or neglect. This course will explore the necessity of working with a multi disciplinary team of professionals in preparing a case for the court process, as well as the necessary skills needed to communicate with child victims. The course will require observation of a criminal and civil child abuse case. Grades will be based on an exam, short papers and practice exercises, and class participation.

Grading: Letter-graded

Credits: 3

Offered: Fall

Categories: Experiential

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Advanced Legal Research (4612)

This course provides strategies for conducting advanced legal research with an emphasis on how the Internet and advances in technology have changed society and the practice of law. It builds upon the research skills students acquired in the first-year Lawyering Program and doctrinal courses. In addition to federal, state and local legal resources, the course will introduce students to alternative research sources and organizational tools, as well as strategies for successful interdisciplinary research. Students will explore the different approaches needed for policy and planning research versus transactional and litigation research. A combination of lectures, homework assignments, research exercises and other activities will allow students to apply research concepts in practical settings.

Grading: Letter-graded

Credits: 2

Offered: Fall

Categories: Experiential

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Legislation (4681)

Presents an overview of the legislative process through lectures, readings, speakers, and a series of drafting exercises. Covers a range of topics pertaining to legislative advocacy, including the legislative process, developing an effective legislative strategy, ethics in lobbying, effective representation of clients before the legislature, the role of the executive and judicial branches, and careers at the legislature. The motivation to actively participate in class sessions is critical to successful completion of the course.

Grading: Letter-graded.

Credits: 2

Offered: Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Administrative and Legislative Process, Government Practice

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Externship: Judicial (4900)

A student enrolled in an independent judicial externship is responsible for his or her own learning by working under the guidance of the judge and faculty supervisor. To gain credit, students need to follow the program criteria, including completing an Education Agreement. The Agreement must contain the student's learning goals and a description of field activities.

Grading: Pass/Fail

Credits: variable

Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer

Categories: Experiential

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Externship: Federal Judicial (4901)

Students are placed in externships with federal judges, assisting the judge in a variety of chambers activities. The externship may be taken for either 2, 3 or 4 credits (requiring either 90, 135 and 180 work hours during the semester). The number of credits will depend in part on the preferences of participating judges. In addition, students meet regularly with the course professor and complete written and other assignments. Students must apply to be admitted to the program. Applications will be reviewed by members of the Judicial Clerkship Committee and, in some cases, by participating judges. Preference will be given to students who (1) will be third-year full-time and fourth-year part-time students, (2) are in the top 15% of their class and (3) have significant writing experience (for example Law Review, Law Journal or Moot Court). To apply, send an email with your resume, transcript and carefully-written short essay (400 words or less) that explains why you want to participate in the program, to Karen Vander Sanden at karen.vandersanden@mitchellhamline.edu. Please indicate in the email how many credits you are interested in earning for this experience. Applications will be reviewed by members of the Judicial Clerkship Committee. You will be notified if you have received an externship prior to registration.

Grading: Pass/Fail

Credits: variable

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential

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Persuasive Legal Writing (5070)

Develops skills in writing to persuade. The premise is that persuasive legal writing involves two distinct skills: the ability to analyze source materials and the ability to use the rules of grammar and style to state this analysis and the conclusions the writer effectively draws from this analysis. Course materials consist of hypothetical fact situations and statutes, regulations and cases distributed before each course segment, as well as examples of good and bad writing, which include both legal and non-legal writing. Class discussions analyze the legal materials as they relate to the hypotheticals, review rules of grammar and style, and analyze the writing samples and the written assignments prepared by students. Students write fact statements, issue statements and arguments based on the hypothetical facts and the legal materials distributed for the assignment. No research will be required. The students' work is reviewed by the professor and discussed in subsequent classes. The course grade is based on performance on the class assignments and a final paper. Limited enrollment.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: 2

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential

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Clinic: Intellectual Property Law (5111)

This course will provide students with direct experience working with clients and practicing attorneys in the areas of copyright, patent and trademark law. Students will apply their substantive learning of the law to related IP projects, where they will have an opportunity to hone their basic skills and theoretical understanding in various IP areas. Students with a particular interest in one of the IP focus areas will, to the extent possible, be assigned cases in that area. The Clinic will focus on representing clients in a broad array of IP matters, including filing and prosecuting patent and trademark applications before the USPTO, policy-making, and educating the business and arts communities on the essentials of IP protection. Students who are interested in representing clinic clients in patent matters before the USPTO must be eligible for admission to the patent bar. To participate in the USPTO clinical program, students enrolled in the clinic will need, in coordination with the IP Law Clinic, to apply for temporary registration to practice before the USPTO. The Clinic is offered as a year-long (fall and spring semester) course to provide students with the broadest range of opportunities to work with clients and before the USPTO. Students graduating after fall semester may take the Clinic for fall semester only, and any spring openings because of graduating fall students may be filled on a case-by-case basis.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: 3

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential

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Pretrial Litigation (5200)

Explores the major facets of pretrial litigation. Students study litigation planning, pleadings, discovery, motion practice, and related elements. Students participate in simulated and written exercises involving these skills which are critiqued by experienced practitioners. Students will NOT be allowed to drop this course after the end of the first week of the semester. Prerequisite: Civil Dispute Resolution or Civil Procedure.

Grading: Letter-graded

Credits: 2

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Child and Family Law

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Intellectual Asset Management (5400)

This course is designed to immerse students in the processes involved in managing an intellectual asset portfolio. Basic knowledge of patents, trademarks, copyright and trade secret will be assumed. The class will operate as a real world microcosm with each student assigned a fictional company to act as CHIEF IP COUNSEL managing an intellectual asset portfolio. Students will participate through in depth reading assignment, classroom activities/assignments, lecture and guest speakers.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: 3

Offered: e/o Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Intellectual Property

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Workers' Compensation (5570)

Surveys no-fault compensation laws covering personal injuries in employment, including substance, procedure, and benefits under workers' compensation law.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: 2

Offered: Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Employment Law, Health Law, Personal Injury, Torts

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Clinic: Reentry (7002)

Students provide civil legal services and other assistance to women leaving prison in Shakopee, Minnesota. This clinic uses a holistic model of representation through collaboration with a social worker. Students in this clinic will provide civil legal services to women reentering society and also will provide other creative assistance with barriers to reintegration. Students will work closely with the Department of Corrections and many local social services agencies to assist clients. Students will work with 4-6 women per semester. Students will represent clients from initial interviews through conclusion of court cases, including all court appearances.

Grading: Letter-graded.

Credits: 2

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential

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Externship: Criminal Justice - Prosecution (7110)

This externship involves students in numerous courtroom appearances on behalf of the prosecution in all phases of the misdemeanor case. Students prosecute misdemeanor cases and attend skills exercise classes. Each student, under the direct supervision of a practicing city attorney, observes and conducts the charging of cases, arraignments, pretrial conferences, court trials and, where possible, a jury trial. Classroom discussions consider both the prosecution and defense roles and focus on special areas of importance to the misdemeanor practitioner, with an emphasis on the DWI and Implied Consent Laws.

Grading: Pass/Fail

Credits: variable

Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Criminal Law

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Externship: Law and Business (8001)

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to observe, participate in, analyze, and reflect upon the work of a business lawyer or business professional. Students perform fieldwork under the supervision of a lawyer in a company or law firm setting. The professor has established relationships with some companies and law firms that regularly provide placements, but students are encouraged to seek placements of interest to them. Fieldwork supervision must be provided by an attorney, and students receiving credit for the externship may not be paid for their work. In addition to doing fieldwork, students meet as a group with the professor on a regular basis during the semester. Class sessions cover topics relating to the work of a business lawyer or business professional. Students interested in registering for the course must complete a placement preference form and obtain the professor's approval for registration. Students may not drop this course after being assigned an externship placement.

Grading: Pass/Fail

Credits: 4

Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Business and Commercial

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Externship: Administrative Law (8002)

Students will work closely with Administrative Law Judges at the Minnesota Office of Administrative Hearings in St. Paul to gain an understanding of the trial-type contested cases and rulemaking hearings. The class will cover the responsibilities of ALJs under the Minnesota Administrative Procedure Act and consider how due process principles apply to the enforcement and policy-making roles of state agencies. Students will observe contested case hearings and a rule hearing (if available). Draft contested case decisions for an ALJ, and write four short externship reflection papers.

Grading: Pass/Fail.

Credits: 1

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Administrative and Legislative Process

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Clinic: Indian Law: Impact Litigation (8010)

The Indian Law Impact Litigation Clinic is available for upper-level students who are interested in Federal Indian Law. The Clinic will provide a mixture of direct representation to Indian tribes in federal courts in Minnesota and/or Wisconsin, as well as amicus curiae support in cases pending in federal appellate courts and the U.S. Supreme Court. Cases are referred to the Clinic by practicing attorneys and through partnerships with federally recognized tribes and tribal organizations. Note: This course is unavailable through online registration. To register, please contact Professor Routel for an interview at least one week prior to registration.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: variable

Offered: Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Indian Law

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Clinic: Indian Law: Tribal Code Drafting (8011)

This course may be taken for 3 or 4 credits. The Indian Law Clinic is available for upper-level students who are interested in Federal Indian Law and Tribal Law. Students in the fall Clinic will work on various approved legal development projects at the request of American Indian governments and organizations. Typical projects include constitution drafting and reform, drafting and amendment of statutes, creation of both western-style, traditional, and hybrid dispute resolution processes, and law clerk services to such forums.

Grading: Letter graded

Credits: variable

Offered: Fall

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Indian Law

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Advanced Advocacy: Civil Litigation (8200)

Covers all aspects of advocacy involved in jury trials, bench trials, administrative hearings, and arbitration. Students learn by performing videotaped exercises in every class, and are critiqued by experienced lawyers and judges. The course covers case preparation, opening statements, direct examination, cross-examination, exhibits, expert witnesses, jury selection, summation, and advocacy ethics. Cases cover a range of civil and criminal problems. Students prepare written questions, outlines, and a trial brief, and try a complete bench trial or arbitration case and a full-day jury trial. Offered as a full-semester course during the fall and spring semesters, and in a concentrated format during summer session.

Grading: Letter-graded.

Credits: 3

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Civil Litigation

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Clinic: Business Law (8212)

Students work with practicing business and corporate lawyers to provide legal advice to eligible small business clients referred by community organizations. Students may have the opportunity to work with clients in a variety of business law matters that affect the small business owner, including choice of business entity; drafting formation documents; contract drafting; corporate dissolution; lease negotiations; employment law matters; and non-profit incorporation.

Grading: Letter graded

Credits: 2

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Business and Commercial

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Internet Legal Research Skills (8235)

Students receive practical skills training using the Internet for legal research. The course focuses on free and low-cost authoritative resources and emphasizes the location and content of primary legal materials on the Internet. The course is designed to help prepare students for successful practice.

Grading: Letter graded

Credits: 1

Offered: e/o Spring

Categories: Experiential

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Family Mediation (8241)

Family mediation offers divorcing couples a cooperative and constructive way to resolve differences and plan for the future. Minnesota now requires that mediation be considered early in the dissolution process. The interactive course provides students with the opportunity to become qualified family neutrals under Supreme Court Rule 114. Students study conflict resolution and emotional issues surrounding divorce as well as learning specific techniques for mediating custody and property disputes. Special attention is paid to identifying families experiencing domestic violence. A variety of teaching methods are used, including demonstrations, role play, and discussion. Students cannot earn credit in both 8241 Family Mediation and 3040 Mediation.

Grading: Letter-graded.

Credits: 3

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Child and Family Law

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Clinic: Civil Advocacy (8305)

Students take full responsibility for representing clients. The course focuses on the challenges of representing real people against real opponents in an ethical, reflective, and creative way. Under close supervision of faculty, students interview and counsel clients, direct discovery and fact investigation, negotiate disputes, prepare trial memos and motions, conduct administrative hearings and district court trials, and, on occasion, write briefs and argue unemployment cases in the Court of Appeals. Cases cover a variety of subject areas, including landlord-tenant, unemployment compensation and employment, and consumer and welfare matters. Students meet weekly in seminar in addition to meeting individually with faculty for supervision of casework. Some required activities (such as court appearance, investgation and interviews) take place during normal business hours, but most students are able to combine this clinic's work with their own employment and care-giving responsibilities.

Grading: Letter graded

Credits: variable

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Public Interest Law

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Consumer Rights Law (8311)

Students will examine and apply a variety of consumer rights statutes, in both state and federal courts, to a variety of real world situations. Students will learn private consumer rights law through observing and conducting in-class live-client and simulated intake and screening interviews, case studies, lectures, quizzes, discovery assignments, drafting of basic federal litigation forms, class discussions, and selected readings. The class will have the feel of a workshop and may include some off-site class meetings. Students will earn to issue spot, screen clients, document and strengthen cases, and select appropriate claims. There will be a heavy emphasis on litigation strategy within the complex system of the federal courts where most consumer rights claims are litigated. Readings will emphasize practical application.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: 2

Offered: Spring

Categories: Experiential

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Clinic: Law & Psychiatry (8400)

The Law & Psychiatry Clinic is the exploration of intersections between psychiatry and mental illness and legal rules and procedures. This course concentrates on major issues in psychiatry and law. Outside speakers from legal, judicial, and psychiatric communities are invited as guest lecturers. This course includes lectures on assessment in forensic settings, competence to stand trial, criminal responsibility, civil commitment and discussions on personality disorders and correctional environments. This course also includes the opportunity to view and participate in actual clinical assessments. This Clinic is comprised of psychiatric residents, psychology fellows and law students. All parties will be expected to read the case files, legal and psychiatric materials and come prepared for a healthy discussion on these issues. Additionally, all students will participate in mock testimony scenarios based on one or more of the case studies.

Grading: Pass/fail

Credits: 2

Offered: Spring

Categories: Experiential

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Externship: Criminal Justice - Defense (8555)

The participating students will be placed with Public Defender's Offices in the Metro Area. Because there will be court appearances required, the students must be available during the day and must be eligible to be certified as student attorneys under the Minnesota Student Practice Rules at the start of the externship. The State Public Defender has implemented a policy that does not allow law clerks/student attorneys (whether volunteer, paid, or externs) to be placed with our offices if they are also working for a prosecutor’s office during the same time frame. In addition to their onsite placements, the students will be required to attend a two hour seminar discussion.

Grading: Pass/Fail

Credits: 3

Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Criminal Law

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Clinic: Immigration Law (8752)

Students represent indigent clients in administrative proceedings before the Immigration and Naturalization Service and Federal Court. Cases concern the immigration status of aliens. Students interview and counsel clients, research laws and regulations, write briefs, prepare for hearings, and act as trial counsel at evidentiary hearings. Heavy emphasis is placed upon active representation of clients, and cases that present novel and interesting issues of law and fact. Some required activities (such as court appearances, investigation and interviews) take place during normal business hours.

Grading: Letter graded

Credits: variable

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Criminal Law, Public Interest Law

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Externship: District Court (8805)

Students intern with state court judges, magistrates or referees (occasionally with a federal judge). Students participate in a variety of clerking activities, attend chamber discussion, and observe trials and hearings. Class meetings will be held to discuss topics related to judicial ethics and the judicial process. Students must have regular daytime hours available in order to fulfill time requirements for the course.

Grading: Pass/fail

Credits: variable

Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Criminal Law

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Legal Practicum (8905)

Engages students in simulated learning experiences and exercises. Students practice law in two-person law firms under the supervision of faculty and tutors. Simulated cases, problems and clients are presented to each law firm during the semester, requiring the student attorneys to handle a significant variety of integrated substantive and procedural law involving the following areas: personal injury, professional responsibility, employment law, criminal law, employment/labor law, administrative law and real estate law. Each two-person law firm is involved in proceedings including a jury trial, oral arguments, motion arguments, arbitration, negotiation, and in-chambers settlement conference. Students interview clients, investigate facts, prepare pleadings and motions, draft documents, compose memos, and prepare research memos and briefs. Students can take the course for either 3 or 5 credits. Only the 5 credit course satisfies the Advanced Research and Writing requirement.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: 3 or 5

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential, Long Paper

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Clinic: LAMP (9002)

Students provide civil representation to indigent persons incarcerated in Minnesota. Students represent clients from interview through any trial. Cases include domestic relations, imprisonment-related matters (institutional grievances, parole, and detainers), and the full range of other civil problems including debtor-creditor, wills, contracts, torts, and civil rights issues. LAMP Clinic on the Web

Grading: Letter graded

Credits: variable

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Civil Litigation, Criminal Law, Child and Family Law, Public Interest Law

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Residency - Criminal Law Residency Seminar (9004)

Only offered in the spring, the Criminal Law Residency Program gives students in their final year of law school an opportunity for intensive practical training in the field. The 2-credit weekly seminar focusing on development of professional judgment as well as doctrine and skills related to the Residency. Students are placed in prosecutor's and public defender's offices, and private law firms and work 3-5 days each week. In addition to the 2-credit seminar, students receive between 8 and 13 credits for work at the Residency Placement. Students must apply and be accepted into the program before being matched with a Residency Placement. Due to the intensity of the workload, applicants should be in their final year of law school and have a demonstrated interest and prior course work in the substantive area of criminal law.

Grading: Pass/Fail

Credits: 2

Offered: Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Criminal Law

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Residency - Family Law Residency Seminar (9005)

Only offered in the spring, the Family Law Residency Program gives students in their final year of law school an opportunity for intensive practical training in the field. The 2-credit weekly seminar focuses on development of professional judgment as well as doctrine and skills related to the Residency. Students are placed in various family law settings for 3-5 days a week, including legal aid offices, private firms, and prosecutor's offices. In addition to the 2-credit seminar, students receive between 8 and 13 credits for work at the Residency Placement. Students must apply and be accepted into the program before being matched with a Residency Placement. Due to the intensity of the workload, applicants should be in their final year of law school and have a demonstrated interest and prior course work in the substantive area of family law.

Grading: Pass/Fail.

Credits: 2

Offered: Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Child and Family Law

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Externship - Compliance (9007)

The course is designed to provide students the opportunity to observe, participate in, analyze, gain insight into the functions of and reflect upon the work of compliance professionals. In their field placements, students will observe and participate in activities specific to the field placement, which can include attending meetings/conference calls, researching applicable regulations, learning about the methods of implementing and monitoring compliance procedures, and responding to government agencies. In addition to doing fieldwork, students will attend a seminar on a regular basis during the semester. Students will bring their experience into the classroom for detailed analysis of the compliance professional's work. The seminar will focus on the seven elements of effective compliance and ethics program as outlined in the 2011 Federal Sentencing Guidelines Manual, with specific context on understanding and learning the skills that are necessary for compliance professionals. Class time will also be used to address ethical issues compliance professionals face in their work and methods to address the ethical dilemmas. Finally, contemporary issues will be incorporated into the class discussion and analysis of organization's compliance programs and its problems and solutions. Students will be placed in organizations with compliance professionals with J.D.s. Students may also find their own placements and may register for the course after receiving permission from the course instructor.

Grading: Pass/Fail

Credits: 3

Offered: Spring

Categories: Experiential

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Transactions and Settlements (9014)

This skills course teaches negotiation, drafting, and advocacy in both the transactional and litigation contexts. The focus is on how lawyers represent clients in negotiating and drafting contracts and settlement agreements. The course also covers ethical issues arising in lawyering. Examples are drawn from a variety of contexts, including business, consumer rights, public affairs, intellectual property, real estate, and litigation, and applied through simulations, short case studies, exercises, and class discussion.

Grading: Letter-graded. Students are graded on performance in simulations (e.g., negotiation) and on written work (e.g., contract drafting). Students who do not demonstrate "proficiency" in a skill can redo the exercise or assignment to demonstrate proficiency.

Credits: 3

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Business and Commercial, Employment Law

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Residency - Family Law Field Placement (9015)

Only offered in the spring, the Family Law Residency Program gives students in their final year of law school an opportunity for intensive practical training in the field. The 2-credit weekly seminar focuses on development of professional judgment as well as doctrine and skills related to the Residency. Students are placed in various family law settings for 3-5 days a week, including legal aid offices, private firms, and prosecutor's offices. In addition to the 2-credit seminar, students receive between 8 and 13 credits for work at the Residency Placement. Students must apply and be accepted into the program before being matched with a Residency Placement. Due to the intensity of the workload, applicants should be in their final year of law school and have a demonstrated interest and prior course work in the substantive area of family law.

Grading: Pass/Fail

Credits: Variable

Offered:

Categories: Experiential

Subject Areas: Child and Family Law

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Externship - Civil Rights Litigation and Policy (9043)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to observe, participate in, analyze, gain insight into the functions of, and reflect upon the work of lawyers practicing and promoting civil rights through litigation and policy work. Field placements will include law firms and non-profit advocacy organizations. In their field placements, students will observe and participate in activities specific to the field placement, which could include litigation, legal research, legislation, policy analysis and promotion, and other related work. In addition to doing fieldwork, students will attend a seminar on a regular basis during the semester. Students will bring their experience into the classroom for detailed analysis of the lawyers' work, function of the different placement organizations, and the role of the various lawyers with whom they work. Students will make brief, guided presentations on their work and observations. Students will also meet individually with course faculty during the semester. Students enrolled in the course will complete a placement preference form and will be matched to an appropriate placement site by course faculty. Students may also find their own placements and may register for the class after receiving permission from course faculty and the Externship Director.

Grading: Pass/Fail

Credits: 3

Offered: Spring

Categories: Experiential

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Clinic: Child Protection (9070)

Students will represent parents whose children have been removed from the home. The students will meet their clients at the initial hearing and will continue to represent their clients throughout the case, including a trial if necessary. The cases in this clinic will come from Ramsey County and all court appearances will be in Ramsey County on either Tuesday or Thursday mornings. This is a one semester clinic.

Grading: Letter Graded

Credits: 2

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential

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Advocacy (9555)

This course teaches students the basic skills all lawyers use in the representation of clients. Students observe and discuss demonstrations of advocacy skills and then practice these skills in a small-group setting. Performance exercises include deposition, direct examination, cross-examination, closing argument and final trial. Students also write an appellate brief and make an appellate argument.

Grading: Letter graded.

Credits: 3

Offered: Fall/Spring

Categories: Experiential, Required

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